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Sift Security + Visa Threat Intelligence



Incident responders and threat hunters depend on high fidelity threat intelligence to get early notification of attacks.  Threat intelligence is most useful when it describes attacks targeting peer organizations and it includes important contextual information.  This contextual information can include what types of attacks the indicators of compromise (IoCs) represent, when they were first observed, and how they are related to other IoCs.  

Sift Security has teamed up with Visa Threat Intelligence (VTI) to help merchants determine if they have been a target of a breach and to avoid future breaches. VTI provides high fidelity IoCs curated by Visa’s Risk and Fraud team, who work with merchants to collect and analyze TTP’s (Tactics, Techniques & Procedures) used by crime organizations during a breaches targeting merchants.  Sift Security combines VTI into our security graph analytics platform to enable timely notification of potential breaches and effective threat hunting.  

To help you see how Sift Security + VTI could benefit your organization, we have posted a Case Study describing how we leveraged VTI to find multiple security incidents at a tech company in Silicon Valley, and a Video showing how we did this using our product.

If you think you might be able to benefit from Sift Security + VTI, consider a security assessment.  The goal of an assessment is to identify and investigate potential risks within your organization.  During the assessment, we will:

  • Ingest 1-3 months of data from your network, endpoints, and payment systems
  • Cross reference your data against the most recent VTI indicators 
  • Create a prioritized list of potential risks within your organization
  • Help you investigate these risks
  • Create a Security Assessment Report

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